Recommended Agency

text controls: text only | A A A

Lots of jobs at a growing Focus! See https://t.co/j4SZgV0BZf for more and help make great digital! #jobs #bristol, posted 4 months ago

RSS feed icon What is RSS?

blog.

articles tagged with: training


Displaying all 4 articles

UK-based Web Accessibility Courses

UK-based Web Accessibility Courses

A couple of years ago I was nominated as the ‘accessibility champion’ for focus. You may recall this from my blog in which I manage to compare myself to Muhammad Ali (who says the title of champion went to my head?). 

Web accessibility is about making your website available to as many users as possible, broadening your audience. So it’s win-win for both users and companies. More employers should benefit from assigning this important role to a team member to network, extend reach and spread knowledge within the company. They don’t have to be an expert already. I’m regularly browsing the web to discover further developments within accessibility. I am delighted to have seen this recognition of the importance of web accessibility go from a subtle nod to an enthusiastic wave.

Initially it was hard work, I was desperate to acquire some training, learn from the experts. I’ve lost count of how many times I've found a course, excitedly attempted to book tickets, only to find the price is in dollars. Oh, THAT Bristol. Pretty sure I can still see my keyboard’s space bar indented in my forehead from those moments. 

If you find you’re still suffering from the same frustration, fortunately, the UK has caught on and more and more training is becoming available. So I’ve put together a list of UK-based training to look forward to in 2017…  

Implement Web Accessibility
 A 1-day website accessibility course provides the technical requirements for building accessible websites using HTML and CSS, i.e. how to: 

- Provide accessible web images, multimedia and text alternatives
- Provide accessible links and navigation
- Ensure that textual content is accessible
- Ensure that colour is used safely
- Make table navigation and data accessible
- Make form navigation, data, and data entry accessible

Understand Web Accessibility
Being held in London, Leeds, Manchester and Cardiff, this is a one day website accessibility training course providing the essential background knowledge for implementing good web accessibility. Understand:

- The requirements of different disabled users
- Problems conventional web designs cause disabled users
- Requirements of UK law and web accessibility standards

Coming to Bristol and various other locations across the UK is this course: Web Accessibility Fundamentals, it brings together the previous two 1-day courses in a single package - because successful website accessibility depends on proper integration between awareness and practical implementation.

Web accessibility training 
Design for every user. Hands-on web accessibility training, small class sizes, highly interactive and taught by experts:

- Learn about the different user groups and their specific accessibility needs.
- Review the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)
- Find out how to implement accessibility
- Learn how to devise and implement accessibility testing
- Create an accessibility action plan

Web Accessibility and Usability 
This course will enable those attending to gain a thorough understanding of Web Accessibility and Usability issues. Techniques for achieving accessibility standards will be covered, along with informal recommendations for delegates’ own websites.

 

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Wednesday December 28 2016 09:21 PM


Tags: accessibility training


Comments [0]








Future Of Web Apps London 2010

Future Of Web Apps London 2010

If you follow us on Twitter you may have seen our tweet stream go a little crazy last week. I was at Future of Web Apps - a 2 day conference for web developers (that’s me) featuring talks from the people behind some of the biggest companies on the web (Google, Opera, Mozilla, Flickr & TweetMeMe to name a few).

As the title implies, it’s all about web apps - web sites that deliver a product or service online and where the technologies behind them are going.

Here are a few highlights of the day.

The Future of HTML5, SVG and CSS3 (Brad Neuberg)

This talk was all about of future technologies of the web. I’ll try not to go all techie on this one, but basically the core technologies used to build websites are evolving. These progressions are allowing developers to build sites than run faster, look better and are more accessible. More features can be handled be your web browser without having to relay on third-party plugins (like flash). These features can include watching online video, easier to understand web pages for people using assistive technologies and amazing interactive animations in your web pages.

The 37signals way: A look into the design process of 37signals (Ryan Singer)

My favourite talk of the day, Ryan Singer is a product manager at 37 signals (the people behind Basecamp). This talk challenged the traditional wireframe, photoshop, code approach to the design process by almost turning whole thing on it’s head! The key points to take away were to focus on the business logic at the center first and get something running in the browser. Team members spend less time waiting on each other and your end design fits the content (rather than the other way round).

Location, Location, Location (Joe Stump)

There’s no doubt the future of web is mobile. The iPhone started the smart-phone revolution in 2007 and in the next couple of years mobile web browsing is expected to surpass browsing from the desktop. Whereas with the desktop web content was king, with the mobile web context is the new king. This is because the amount of data we’re producing is growing exponentially (side note: Joe claimed that every two days 2.6 million terabytes of data - which is the same amount we produced up until 2003). Without providing context to all the data we’re producing it’s useless.

Future of JavaScript and jQuery (John Resig)

The title is a little cryptic, but this talk introduced a very powerful tool for developing the latest generation of mobile web apps. The jQueryMobile project aims to provide a set of tools for creating great looking user interfaces across a plethora of mobile devices. The idea being developers can spend more time focused on implementing great features and less time debugging different devices. The ‘alpha’ release is due next week with the finished ‘1.0’ release in January.

Created on Monday October 18 2010 10:00 AM


Tags: technology web-development networking browser conference training fowa 2010


Comments [1]








What's Next? The Half Marathon?

What's Next? The Half Marathon?

"The man who can drive himself further once the effort gets painful is the man who will win" (Sir Roger Bannister)

Well thanks Roger, we weren't in it to win it but it certainly was painful. The Focus team have succesfully completed the much anticipated Bristol 10km race. Paul and Duncan have been pounding the streets for the last 2 months in preparation for the big race and it was well worth it. The guys were joined by almost 9000 other runners dressed in an array of outfits from Scooby Doo to flamingos and even a man dressed in a suit smoking a pipe.

The event was brilliant, well organised and great fun. Well done Bristol!! I think there may be talk in the office of a half Marathon next!

Created on Monday May 10 2010 12:00 PM


Tags: bristol training fundraising


Comments [0]








Working through WCAG 2.0

Last month I was privileged enough to have the opportunity to spend a day with the RNIB (Royal National Institute of Blind People) super-accessibility-squad, or SAS for short, and blown away by how much information can be picked up in just a day.

I was in the "Working through WCAG 2.0" day-long workshop, and I would recommend it to anyone who would like to work out some of the differences between the old and new Website Accessibility Guidelines, and/or learn some up-to-date best practises on attempting to meet these guidelines.

My experience was made even better because I was able to sit next to someone who only coded using screen-reading technology, and was therefore able to gain an insight into a level of accessibility know-how that I could not have gained any other way.

I was interested in the realistic approach taken by the RNIB. Whilst they have every right to scream and shout about the unbelievable amount of inaccessible material out there on and off the web, they instead pointed out the small things that you can quickly change to make a big difference to all of your users. This was the least that a user should expect from a website, allowing us all to progress into more complex issues with a good understanding of the standards expected by the RNIB.

Another interesting idea was that by trying to meet all AAA Priority guidelines in WCAG 2.0 could in fact exclude more users than aiming to meet the AA Priority guidelines and only a few but well chosen guidelines from AAA Priority! Obviously this is determined by the user group, but it was an interesting point that could only be really made by the experts!

Hopefully I've sung their praises enough, so please have a look for yourself as I would recommend this course to small and big companies alike, because this is the way web best-practise is definitely taking us.

Course details: http://www.rnib.org.uk/..../work_through_WCAG_2.0.aspx
Related article: http://www.rnib.org.uk/professionals/..../uk_law.aspx

Created on Wednesday October 14 2009 03:16 PM


Tags: website internet web-development wcag-20 accessibility training


Comments [0]