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Top 10 accessibility mistakes

Top 10 accessibility mistakes

When Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web, he intended it to be an open platform for society to connect, improve communication and build knowledge. It was a way to provide everyone with vast amounts of information, not just some or a select privileged few. It is said that building accessibility was his vision for bettering the globe.

If you want to stay in Tim's good books, you might want to avoid these incredibly common accessibility mistakes: 

1. Alt text for images

Images are often not properly marked up with alternative text for those who can't see images, or separated so that only the relevant images are relayed to the user, or conveyed. 

2. Keyboard Accessibility

Users can find themselves 'trapped' inside of a page's content and be prevented from interacting unless they're using a mouse. 

3. Dynamic Content Focus

Content appears based on a users action without any indication to those who can't see it. This could be form errors or a date picker: Equally frustrating for those who can see it but can't use it. 

4. Focus indicators

No knowledge of where a user is on the page when they're only using a keyboard. Making it very difficult to navigate the site. 

5. Data tables

Tables that have corresponding column and row heading associations that cannot be deciphered with ease. 

6. Poor heading structures

Undetermined list content where it's conveyed like a list but not structured like one. 

7. Colour cues

Using colour alone to convey a part of the page, for example 'For further information select the red button below'. Those with a colour deficiency are going to struggle. 

8. Multimedia

Missing captions from instructional or informative web experiences. 

9. Skip to content

Someone who is unable to use a mouse is forced to repeat their steps if there is no skip to content option. This would be extremely tedious on pages containing unchanging content such as a content heavy main navigation. 

10. Page titles

It's a small but very important element that is the very first thing users hear on a page. It indicates what the user is about to discover. Without it, users don't know what to expect.

Get accessibility right and it can even better your business. We'll tell you how in our next blog - so watch this space!

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Tuesday March 22 2016 01:27 PM


Tags: accessibility userexperience top-tips


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How to get a bullseye when targeting your email broadcasts!

How to get a bullseye when targeting your email broadcasts!

We've been conducting some in depth research here at Focus HQ. Having studied the success of some of our email broadcast campaigns we have the following top tips to get the most out of your email campaigns:

1) HTML emails as opposed to text only emails are 10 times more likely to have their links clicked. So get creative with some graphic design!

2) Generally emails with subject titles that contain 'Top 10 offers' or 'Top 20 offers' score low views - it just sounds like a lot of information, people can't face reading a long email. Keep it short and sweet!

3) Emails with 'exclusive offers' or discounts in the subject titles tend to be more successful. Everyone likes to think they're getting a bargain!

Now we've armed you with these top tips you're ready to aim and fire your email campaigns! Of course if you want some help with an email campaign, we're always available for a chat!