Recommended Agency

text controls: text only | A A A

Find out more about Google's changing stance on secure sites in our latest blog post https://t.co/Jfw1kYy2hR #SSL https://t.co/0s3dYMos6R, posted about 1 month ago

RSS feed icon What is RSS?

blog.

Bad UX can cost you

Bad UX can cost you

Last year bad User Experience (UX) reportedly cost LInkedIn over £9 million.
Attention to detail is imperative when it comes to producing great design with a smooth UX. But with so much involved in the design process, there is a risk of things going unnoticed.

It doesn't take much to damage the users experience so here are some things worth checking before a design is signed off and deemed good to go...

 

Don't rely on colour to convery a purpose, heierarchy or content

We are big on accessibility here at focus so to us producing a website that is accessible is not considered a nice-to-have but a must-have. People with visual disabilities for example colour blindness, would not be able to use your site effectively if you were to rely on colour, they would therefore become an excluded demographic.

Test it: colorfilter.wickline.org will let you put a color filter on top of your webpage and test it for different kinds of color blindnesses.

 

Avoid / reduce repetitive actions where possible

An example of a repetitive action is filling in a form that asks for your address more than once, you may have seen this being tackled with a tickbox you can select to say your billing adddress is the same as your shipping address. If you're not careful, users will grow tired and search for an alternative option (like a competitor!) where they can achieve their goals better and faster.

Test it: Make sure there is a way of facilitating repetitive actions such as an option to use previously entered information.

 

Accessing help does not get in the way of progress

Users ask for help when they're stuck so of course It is important for help to be an extension of what they are already doing, they should be able to easily return to that once they have received the help they need.

Test it: Put yourself in the place of the user, consider where they will ask for help, and see whether their progress are interrupted.

 

Consistent navigation

Users have to be able to find their way around and achieve their goals no matter what page they find themselves on.

Test it: Make sure that navigation is reachable on every page and that your pathways are as intuitive as possible.

 

Foreground and background are sufficiently contrasted

This is especially important for people with visual disabilities. It also improves a user’s understanding. Clear distinction aids with navigation, draws more attention to buttons and increases usability.

Test it: You could capture the screen, apply a gaussian blur to a Radius of around 3px to 5px then see if you can easily tell what’s in the foreground and what’s in the background. Then alter accordingly.

 

Don't use much more than two distinct font families

Although this isn’t a strict rule it is best for accessibility. For usability and visual purposes, sticking to two simplifies your typographic hierarchy, which improves comprehension.

Test it: Simply check that your design isn’t mixing more than two type families. You should also make sure that the ones you choose are properly matched, you can find out more on this.

 

Text fonts are no smaller than 12 pixels

Again, it’s not a fixed rule but generally speaking readability is severely reduced for sizes below 12 pixels. Ideally a minimum of 14px is said to be better for accessibility.

Test it: Pretty obvious I suppose, check all of your content to ensure all fonts used are at least 12px.

 

Reserve uppercase words for labels, headers, or acronyms

Limiting the use of uppercase words is less visually heavy and easier for the user to digest. It should be used specifically for emphasis or very restricted cases such as acronyms.

Test it: A thorough content check to make sure that uppercase words are kept to a minimum and only used where necessary.

 

You're stil wondering what LinkedIn did so wrong aren't you? A settlement in California resulted in LinkedIn dishing out over £9 million to compensate users who were manipulated by the site’s deceptive UX into handing over their address books, which LinkedIn then used to spam their contacts with connection requests.

See, bad UX can cost you!

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Monday May 09 2016 02:14 PM


Tags: website ux accessibility


Comments [0]








Comments


Add a comment