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Find out more about Google's changing stance on secure sites in our latest blog post https://t.co/Jfw1kYy2hR #SSL https://t.co/0s3dYMos6R, posted 30 days ago

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August 2017


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Google's changing stance on secure sites

We posted at the end of last year about Google’s preferential treatment of secure sites and in 2017 they have extended their public warning system a step further. 

 

 

As of January 2017, Google is now clearly marking all websites that do not have an SSL certificate with an information icon (i) that informs the user that the website should not be used for entering personal details (below). 

 

 

 

 

On any pages that do have fields for entering payment details, personal information or passwords but the address is HTTP not HTTPS, this message changes to NOT SECURE with a warning symbol. As you can imagine this can make visitors to websites wary, especially as Google specifies that this information “could be stolen by attackers”. 

 

 

 

 

Chrome plan to eventually display a Not Secure red triangle on all HTTP pages, whether they contain sensitive input fields or not. Ideally all sites will have migrated to HTTPS for all pages by the time this happens.

 

It is not certain how the other market leading browsers will monitor SSL certificate usage but so far it looks as though Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer and Opera are all rolling out a very similar systems.

 

Although there is no real threat to the user if no information is entered into the website, the only real way to avoid triggering these messages is to acquire an SSL certificate from a reputable supplier, and make sure that any pages that deal with sensitive information (passwords, financial details) are secure. Fortunately this is quite straightforward and not as daunting as it may at first seem.

 

If you’d like to have a chat about SSL changes and what they mean for your website get in touch.

 

You can see Google’s original post on the changes.

You can find out more about SSL, what it means and how it’s monitored
here and here 

Frances Smolinski
Frances

Created on Monday August 21 2017 09:08 AM


Tags: blog google ssl http


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